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Reina Reyes

Data Scientist and Astrophysicist

More
reinareyes

Reina Reyes

Data Scientist and Astrophysicist

More
reinareyes

Reina Reyes

Data Scientist and Astrophysicist

More
reinareyes

Reina Reyes

Data Scientist and Astrophysicist

More
reinareyes

About

Reinabelle "Reina" Reyes is a Filipina scientist, teacher, writer, and public speaker. She completed her B.S. degree in Physics from Ateneo de Manila University and her Ph.D. degree in Astrophysics from Princeton University in New Jersey.

In 2014, she returned to Manila with her husband, photographer Gary Coronado. She is equally passionate about data (big and small), the Universe, and the San Antonio Spurs.

EDUCATION

Ph.D., Astrophysics (2011)
Princeton University
New Jersey, USA

Diploma, High Energy Physics (2006)
Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP)
Trieste, Italy

B.S., Physics, Summa cum laude (2005)
Ateneo de Manila University
Quezon City, Philippines

SELECTED AWARDS

Gawad Lagablab Award (2015)
Philippine Science High School National Alumni Association

Richard Kaye Korn Prize (2009-2010)
Princeton University

Centennial Fellowship (2006-2011)
Princeton University

Chambliss Astronomy Achievement Student Award
Honorable Mention (Jan 2007)

AAS 211th Meeting

Martin Schwarzschild Graduate Fellowship (2006 – 2007)
Princeton University

Academic Scholarship (2001-2005)
Ateneo de Manila University

Merit Scholarship (2001-2005)
Department of Science and Technology, Philippines

Press Mentions

RESEARCH WORK

Einstein’s Gravity Confirmed on a Cosmic ScaleNational Geographic News. March 10, 2010.

Einstein passes cosmic testNature. March 10, 2010.

Princeton scientists say Einstein’s theory applies beyond the solar system. News at Princeton. March 12, 2010.

Putting Relativity to the Test. NOVA Online (PBS). July 14, 2011.

INTERVIEWS/PROFILES

The Filipina who proved Einstein right. Rappler.com. March 19, 2012.

Asia’s Rising Scientists: Reina Reyes. AsianScientist.com. February 17, 2016.

Seeing Stars With Dr. Reina Reyes. Positively Filipino. March 08, 2016.

Filipina scientist: ‘You’re lucky to be Pinay’. GMA News Online. March 9, 2014.

Articles & Essays

Selected contributions to publications

From Einstein's Universe to the Multiverse

Today, we know that the Universe is filled with galaxies, and our Galaxy, The Milky Way, is only one of many hundreds of billions. In turn, each galaxy is made up of billions to hundreds of billions of stars.

[published on GMA News Online]

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Life Lessons from Astronomy

However way you twist it, the blunt truth is that our study of the heavens does not directly impact everyday life on Earth (astrology notwithstanding). Our discoveries do not feed hungry people, cure sick people, or better the lives of poor people. Yet, our ever-expanding understanding of the heavens has profoundly shaped– and will continue to profoundly shape– how the human race thinks of itself and its place in the cosmos.

[written for the Astronomers Without Borders blog]

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The Science Behind Why Filipinos Suck at Science

When you hear the word “science,” you might think of that subject in school with the complicated equations on a blackboard that only a super genius can solve, or an image of Einstein, pensive and wise, or Newton’s falling apple. These are all fine associations, but they miss a crucial aspect of what science is—the human aspect, the scientist herself.

[published on Manila Bulletin]

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Love May Be How Stars Align

THIS post-Valentine’s, we look at the lives of stars, and see what they can teach us about love and relationships. Warning: #hugot material to follow, with a cosmic twist.

[published on Business Mirror]

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[Pinoy Mind Map] Kakanin

Suddenly, strangely, I found myself craving for suman. It was strange to me, this sensation, acute and lingering. I’ve never had one like it before, despite 8 years of living abroad. So I paid attention. And of course, I shared it on Facebook. A friend replied, “Your tastebuds must be getting homesick, Reina.” Indeed, they were. In fact, I was homesick down to my bones.

Just as well, for eating suman is not just about taste. It is a ritual in its own right.

[published on Rappler.com, with artist Kelly Ramos]

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[Pinoy Mind Map] Merienda math

Equations imply balance — whatever is on the left side is the same as what is on the right. No more, no less. Things add up. Even as a kid, I knew that life is rarely, if ever, that neat.

Most times, that can be frustrating. But I’m also beginning to appreciate that that’s a good thing. In fact, the things that make life most interesting — and fulfilling — are those for which 1 + 1 does not merely add up to 2.

[published on Rappler.com, in collaboration with artist Kelly Ramos and photographer Gary Coronado]

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[Pinoy Mind Map] Manila

For a long time, I didn’t miss Manila — and now I know why. To miss her, you must first have had her — long enough to lose her. I left much too early for that. The truth is, I did not lose Manila, it was she who lost me.

When I came back two years ago, she took me back with open arms, and hasn’t let go since. And now I long for her, so profoundly, the words escape me.

Meanwhile, there is this song that keeps playing in my head…

[published on Rappler.com, with artist Kelly Ramos]

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[Pinoy Mind Map] Is the Philippines a small country?

We all know that the USA is a big country. In fact, it is the fourth largest country in the world (next only to Russia, Canada, and China in land area). You can probably picture a map of the USA in your head. Do you have it?

Now, picture a map of the Philippines and mentally place it on top of the USA map. How much smaller is it? In your mind, how many Philippine archipelagos can fit inside the USA? We don’t need an exact number, but give it your best guess.

[published on Rappler.com, with artist Kelly Ramos]

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[Pinoy Mind Map] Highs and lows

How high can you go? The peak of Mt Apo, the highest mountain in the country, towers at 2,954 meters (almost 3 km) above sea level, and overlooks Davao City to the northeast, Digos City to the southeast, and Kidapawan City to the west.

…Imagine taking a gigantic knife and cutting the mountain in half, slicing all the way through the island of Mindanao and its surrounding bodies of water. What would you get?

[published on Rappler.com, in collaboration with geophysicist Soli Garcia and artist Kelly Ramos]

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Coming Home

I identify as a child of the Orient, but actually became an adult in the West. Although I’m not one myself, I can relate to Third Culture Kids (TCKs), who were raised in a culture outside their parents’. Many of them spent their childhood moving from place to place. For them, “home” is not a straightforward concept; for me, it is becoming an increasingly nebulous one.

[published on Rappler.com]

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The value of asking questions

When I was a kid, I asked a lot of questions. Isa akong makulit na bata. Thankfully, my Mom never got tired of them. She didn’t shush me, or dismiss me, like other parents would. And even if she didn’t know the answer, she would simply say, “Anak, hindi ko alam (I don’t know), but we can find out together. And we would look it up in our books. Wala pang Internet noon – can you imagine? (We didn’t have internet before. Can you imagine?)”

So I learned early on that it is OK to ask questions. In fact, it was good to ask them- and to look for the answers. And I’ve never stopped asking since.

[published on Rappler.com]

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PinoyScientists.com

Reina also maintains the Tumblr blog Pinoy Scientists, where she profiles Filipino scientists from various disciplines based in the country and abroad.

By showcasing their work and personalities, she wants to dispel myths about scientists and encourage young Filipinos to believe that they, too, can become scientists themselves.

Go to site

Talks

TEDxDiliman talk: The Value of Asking Questions
Binary stars: a Valentine's talk
GMA News-to-Go with Howie Severino: Kailan at saan traffic?
Homegrown Honors Women 2014: Why are there so few women in top positions in the academe?
Black Holes, Galaxies, and Why Science is an Adventure

Lecture at Ateneo de Davao Univesity: The Birth and Death of the Milky Way